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Estate Tax: What You Need to Know

The United States introduced its first estate tax in 1916 as a way to raise revenue during World War I. Since then, it has undergone numerous changes. Let’s understand the term!
Estate Tax
Estate Tax: What You Need to Know
The specifics of estate tax, including the tax rate, exemptions, and thresholds, vary by jurisdiction and can be subject to local tax laws and regulations.
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Estate tax is a tax levied on the transfer of the net worth of a deceased person to their heirs. The term ‘estate’ refers to the total value of a person’s assets, including real estate, personal property, and investments. The estate tax is a way for the government to collect revenue from large estates and help reduce wealth inequality.

The United States introduced its first estate tax in 1916 as a way to raise revenue during World War I. Since then, it has been a topic of political debate and has undergone numerous changes.

Brief History

The history of estate tax dates back to ancient civilizations, where a form of inheritance tax was used to distribute wealth among citizens. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, many countries introduced estate taxes as a way to generate revenue.

The United States first introduced its federal estate tax in 1916 to raise revenue during World War I. The tax was later repealed in the 1920s but reinstated during the Great Depression in the 1930s. Over the next several decades, it underwent several changes, including changes to exemptions and tax rates.

In 2001, the US federal estate tax was temporarily repealed but reinstated in 2011 with a $5 million exemption and a top tax rate of 35%. In 2018, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act raised the exemption to $11.18 million for individuals and $22.36 million for married couples, with a top tax rate of 40%.

Despite its controversial nature, it remains a significant source of revenue for governments around the world. It continues to be a subject of policy discussions and political debate.

Purpose of Estate Tax

The primary purposes of estate tax are to generate revenue for the government and to reduce wealth inequality.

From the government’s perspective, it is a way to collect revenue from large estates, especially those that may have benefited from advantageous tax laws or policies. The revenue generated can be used to fund government programs, infrastructure projects, and other public goods.

Pros and Cons

Pros

  1. Reducing Wealth Inequality: Estate tax is a way to reduce wealth inequality by taxing large estates and distributing the wealth to the wider population. This can help to prevent the concentration of wealth in a small number of families and promote greater economic equality.
  2. Generating Revenue: It helps the government collect revenue from large estates, especially those that have benefited from advantageous tax laws. The revenue can be used to fund government programs, infrastructure projects, and other public goods.

Cons

  1. Burden on Inheritors: It can be a burden on the inheritors of large estates. They may be required to pay a significant amount of tax on the assets they receive. This can reduce the amount of inheritance they receive and limit their ability to use them for their own needs.
  2. Complexity of Laws: Estate tax laws are complex and challenging for individuals to plan and ensure they are in compliance. This can result in significant costs for estate planning and administration.

Who Pays Estate Tax?

The estate tax is typically paid by the executor of the deceased person’s estate or by the heirs receiving the assets. In some cases, the estate may be required to pay it before distributing the assets to heirs. Who pays and when it is due varies by jurisdiction and can be subject to local laws and regulations.

It’s important to note that estate tax is separate from inheritance tax, which is paid by the beneficiaries of an estate. The latter is calculated based on the value of the assets received by each beneficiary. The former is calculated based on the total value of the deceased person’s estate.

In some countries, both estate and inheritance taxes are imposed, while in others only one is. The laws and regulations governing estate and inheritance taxes vary widely, so it’s important to consult with a professional or financial advisor to understand the specific requirements in your jurisdiction.

Regardless of one’s position, estate tax remains an important part of many systems around the world and continues to play a role in policy discussions and debates. If you are affected by it, consult with a tax professional or financial advisor to ensure you are in compliance with the law. File your taxes with Beem. Estimate your Federal and State taxes with Beem’s free Tax Calculator. Enjoy online tax filing with our 100% accuracy and get the maximum refund. Get started now.

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Amrita Khandelwal

Amrita Khandelwal

This page is purely informational. Beem does not provide financial, legal or accounting advice. This article has been prepared for informational purposes only. It is not intended to provide financial, legal or accounting advice and should not be relied on for the same. Please consult your own financial, legal and accounting advisors before engaging in any transactions.

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